Tag Archive: Ollantaytambo Peru


PeruRail station at Ollantaytambo

PeruRail station at Ollantaytambo

River, road, and rails often run together through this part of the Valle Sagrada – the Sacred Valley – but the river road turns east into the mountains beyond Ollantaytambo , and anyone not trekking the Inca Trail into Machu Picchu must arrive by train.

The good news is that Peru Rail cars are clean and up to date, the seats are spacious and comfortable, and the ride takes little more than an hour.

Aguascalientes 02 2014-05-10

Inca platform on a cliff

The Urubamba River descends steadily from its headwaters on the far side of Cusco.  By the time it reaches Ollantaytambo, it has already dropped by nearly 2,000 feet on its way to the Amazon.  It drops by nearly 3,000 feet more as the train follows it to Aguascalientes through twenty miles of changing microclimates.

 

Inca terraces overlooking a footbridge

Inca terraces overlooking a footbridge

After three days in the Valley, the visitor’s eyes become attuned to  flyspecks of Inca terraces and buildings anchored in the vast landscape, or half-hidden by foliage.

 

 

They appear with amazing frequency along this route, which drives home the point that there was far acreage under cultivation in Inca times than there is today.

 

 

The views are spectacular, and peaks of nearby mountains are sometimes only visible through the train’s vista dome.

 

 

From time to time there’s a wait on a siding for a returning train to pass through a one-lane mountain tunnel.

 

 

 

Riverside homes connected only by footbridge

Riverside homes connected only by footbridge

 

 

The road has long ago veered away from river and rails, and the scattered hamlets along the river are now connected to the opposite bank only by footbridges.

 

 

 

 

 

Boulders worn smooth by rainy season current.

Boulders worn smooth by rainy season current.

 

 

 

The river grows increasingly turbulent as it plunges ever downward.

The rainy season is still months away and boulders above the low water mark have been worn smooth its raging currents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aguascalientes has the look of a Colorado ski village crossed with a Colorado mining town.  It’s nestled in a gorge at the foot of Machu Picchu and anyone can walk along every street of its twenty-five square blocks in little more than an hour.

The railroad runs down Aguascaliente's riverfront street

The railroad runs down Aguascaliente’s riverfront street

 

 

The riverfront street is split down the middle by the Peru Rail tracks, and although there’s little rail traffic beyond the village, it’s possible to dine at an outdoor table within its reach.

Pedestrian bridges knit the two halves of Aguascalientes together.

Pedestrian bridges knit the two halves of Aguascalientes together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The village is divided by a tributary of the Urubamba, and the halves are connected by several bridges from which much of the town is readily visible.

Walking in Aguascalientes almost always involves climbing.

Walking in Aguascalientes almost always involves climbing.

Aguascalientes is a pedestrian delight.

Connected to the rest of the world only by rail, the streets of Aguascalientes are free of any automobiles.

Trash collection without the garbage truck.

Trash collection without the garbage truck.

 

Construction materials, restaurant deliveries, and even trash collection rely on porters and hand trucks.

There is no lack of good restaurants here, but there are far more pizzerias, wi-fi coffee houses, and Peruvian restaurants with menus barely distinguishable from each other.

The "Inca Cross"

The “Inca Cross”

A walk through the village turns up dozens of images of the Chacana, popularly known as the “Inca cross”.

It’s a square superimposed upon a cross with arms marking the four compass points.  It symbolizes the Incas’ view of a three-level world:

Hana Pacha, the upper world in which the gods reside.

Kay Pacha, the world of living people.

Urin Pacha, the underworld inhabited by spirits of the dead.

Aguascalientes takes its name from the therapeutic hot spring at its upper end which can be a welcome stop for anyone who’s overdone a day of hiking.

There are also massage therapists on almost every street corner, and in combination bath and massage makes for a great wind-down after a day on the mountain

A dark-skinned Christ wears an Inca robe.

A dark-skinned Christ wears an Inca robe.

A peek into a church on the main plaza turns up the recurrent image of a crucified Christ robed in an Inca tunic.

Unlike most of the Christ images in Peruvian churches, this one is dark-skinned.

Young women in traditional garb are gathered in anticipation of the Mother’s Day celebration which is just beginning to crank up.

 

Girls in traditional garb in advance of the Mother's Day celebration.

Girls in traditional garb in advance of the Mother’s Day celebration.

Tonight’s a night to turn in early, though, because the plan for tomorrow is to beat the crowds and catch the sunrise over Machu Picchu.  Come along.

 

Some  tips:

  • Only a limited number of Machu Picchu tickets are issued for each day, which will require you to also have round trip reservations for the train and bus shuttle tickets to and from the site.
  • You may encounter baggage restrictions if boarding the train at Ollantaytambo, so consider taking with you only enough baggage for a couple of days and leaving excess baggage at the station checkroom.
  • You’ll also want to have room reservations in Aguascalientes for at least the night before or after your Machu Picchu visit… or maybe both. 

While some Machu Picchu aficionados spend every minute of a full day on the site, even a casual tourist accompanied by a knowledgeable guide should plan on spending no less that 2-3 hours there. 

The crowds are at their lightest at opening, and on Sundays.

  • I used the services of GoToPeru for all of my in-country travel, for reservations and ticketing to cultural sites.  Their guides are excellent and I highly recommend their service.
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Town, terraces, and ruins of Ollentaytambo

Town, terraces, and ruins of Ollentaytambo

Ollantaytambo is where the Inca ruins come most alive.

Here the terraces creep down the mountainside to the very edge of a town in which many Inca structures survive and have been continuously inhabited by their descendants.

It was also once a stronghold of the last independent Inca ruler, Manco II, during his eight year rebellion against the Spanish that ended deep in the mountains at Vilcabamba.

Ollentaytambo is a popular stay-over for backpackers on their way to Machu Picchu

Ollentaytambo is a popular stay-over for backpackers on their way to Machu Picchu

 

Ollantaytambo is the last stop on the Perú Rail line before the Machu Picchu station in Aguascalientes

It’s also a popular stopover for the many backpackers who pick up a connection to the last leg of the  Inca Trail just a few miles down the track.

Those hikers not staying in any of the town’s hostels or lodges cluster around the wi-fi cafes, lounging on their packs and checking email on their iPhones.

 

Man in native dress sits next to a Cusqueña beer truck.

Man in native dress sits next to a Cusqueña beer truck.

On the central plaza, a man in native garb sits, chameleon-like, next to a Cusqueña beer truck of the same color.  The brew, a lager style, is Perú’s most popular beer, although at least two microbreweries now operate out of Lima.

Two women in native dress wait for tourists to arrive

Two women in native dress wait for tourists to arrive

Across the plaza, women in native dress offer to pose for pictures.  Even after only a couple of days in country, the differences in dress among the native peoples is already beginning to sort itself out.

Original Inca walls, streets, and aqueduct

Original Inca walls, streets, and aqueduct

Ollantaytambo’s narrow streets appear unchanged since they were built by the Inca.

They pass between signature walls of stone rising a full story and fitted seamlessly together without benefit of mortar.

Aqueduct gutters along each lane still carry fresh water from the mountains as they did when first built.

Only the telltale design of Spanish Colonial structures erected on these foundations testify to the Conquest.

Ollentaytambo street scene

Ollentaytambo street scene

 

Ollantaytambo seems to absorb the visitor into a time warp.

It’s often possible to stand at a corner and see nothing in any direction that gives a hint of the five centuries that have passed since people first walked these streets.

 

Entrance to traditional Inca home.

Entrance to traditional Inca home.

One home is occupied as a living museum in which the caretakers live just as their Inca ancestors once did.

Corn is only one of the foods air-cured by the Incas.

Corn is only one of the foods air-cured by the Incas.

It’s cool and dim inside.  Ears of corn and lines of fish are suspended from the ceiling, curing in the dry, cool air.  (The word ‘jerky’ comes from the Quechua term “ch’arki”, which means “dried meat”)

Stones used to hand-grind corn.

Stones used to hand-grind corn.

 

Worn stones bear witness to centuries of corn tediously hand-milled.

Corn has been a staple in the Peruvian diet for over 3,000 years, and many varieties are unique to the area.

It’s used to make everything from bread to chicha morada, a refreshing, non-alcoholic beverage made from boiled purple corn.

Guinea pigs - cuy - on the hoof.

Guinea pigs – cuy – on the hoof.

Guinea pigs graze on the dirt floor, fattening up for their unforeseen slaughter.

These animals are native to the region, and have served as a source of protein among the indigenous peoples for thousands of years.

Guinea pig – cuy  – is still to be found on Sacred Valley restaurant menus .

Main ruins in foreground, Inca granary in background on mountain.

Main ruins in foreground, Inca granary in background on mountain.

Most of the archeological site lies on the west end of the town, but a trail up the mountain opposite it leads to several isolated structures above.  A climb to explore them offers a tempting opportunity for a panoramic view of the entire area that’s too much to resist.

These granaries stand about 50 tall, placed to take advantage of cool, dry breezes.

These granaries stand about 50 tall, placed to take advantage of cool, dry breezes.

The climb along a narrow trail with steep drop-offs ascends several hundred feet and the hike takes around half an hour.  The buildings that were barely visible from the town below are now revealed to be granaries, each silo standing nearly 50 feet tall.

View of the main ruin from the slope opposite.

View of the main ruin from the slope opposite.

The hike is worth it, though, because the main part of the site is spectacularly visible in its entirety from this vantage point.

Town in foreground, ruins to right, quarry on the cloud-covered mountain.

Town in foreground, ruins to right, quarry on the cloud-covered mountain.

Towering in the distance across the river is the cloud-wrapped  peak from which the stone for this monumental construction was quarried.

As I survey the panorama from my perch at more than 9,000  it crosses my mind that the Egyptians had to contend with no mountains when they hauled the massive stones with which they built the pyramids.

I can be only more impressed by the Incas’ ingenuity and perseverance.

My train to Aguascalientes and Machu Picchu leaves at mid-day tomorrow, and I’ve got an idea about what to do with a free morning.  Come along and see.

01 Leaving Cusco

Leaving Cusco

The drive from Lima to Cusco takes 13 hours, but the flight takes little more than an hour, and the view of the Andes from the air is nothing short of breathtaking.

02 Sacred Valley mapCusco sits at an ear-popping altitude of 11,152 feet, so it’s not a complete surprise that dried coca leaves – the age-old Andean cure for altitude sickness – sit in a bushel basket at the airport gift shop, free for the taking.  The leaf – chewed like tobacco – has a bitter taste, and many prefer the widely available coca tea instead.  Try using it in combination with muña oil, another native botanical remedy, for even better effect.

04 Steet scene near Poroy

Street scene near Poroy

Many visitors to the Sacred Valley first spend a few days seeing the Cusco sites before moving on, but there are a couple of good reasons to save Cusco for last.

One is that that the Valley is 2,000 feet lower than Cusco, so the traveler can breathe a bit easier.

Another is that observing daily life in the Valley’s farms and villages provides valuable context for the monumental, ceremonial sites in Cusco and at Machu Picchu.

03 Mountains near Chinchero IMG_6949

Mountains near Chinchero

Homes and businesses thin out quickly beyond Poroy as the road climbs another 1,000 feet to Chinchero before beginning its descent into the Valley.

05 Andes seen from near Chinchero IMG_6948

Andes seen from near Chichero

Scenic lookouts along the route offer stunning panoramic views, and from this vantage point snow-capped Andes are clearly visible in the distance.

06 Farms and mountains near Chinchero IMG_6950

Farms and mountains near Chinchero

As the road drops down into the valley it passes through small villages surrounded by checker-boarded farmlands.

Alpaca, goats, and cattle graze in meadows, and the first of the Inca agriculture terraces begin to appear.

07 Drying the corn harvest for winter

Women drying the corn harvest for winter storage

Cusco sits 13 degrees of latitude below the equator, and on this trip in May it’s just weeks away from the winter solstice.

The harvest season is nearly ended, and farmers have laid their corn and potatoes out to cure under the sun in cool, dry mountain air, just as their Inca ancestors did.

 

People here live a life of back-breaking labor, and although they live simply, everyone appears well-fed and sheltered.

There’s an air of hope, and improvements to roads and bridges, along with additions to homes and small businesses, are common sights in even the smallest villages.

 

08 Quinoa drying in the sun

Stalks of quinoa drying in the sun

Potatoes and quinoa are both native to the Andes, and both are dietary staples.  The quinoa crop has also just been harvested and stalks dry in the sun.

09 Stand of eucalyptus trees

Stand of eucalytus trees

Timber is scarce at high altitudes, and eucalyptus trees were imported from Australia to Peru in the mid-1800’s in an effort to develop a ready and renewable source.  The tree is now today so ubiquitous in the Valley that concerns have been raised there and elsewhere about its invasiveness.

10 Motorcyle taxi near Urubamba

Motorcyle taxi near Urubamba

Even though many families own no car, there is schedule train service and bus service between many of the villages, but the most common form of public transportation is a sort of three-wheeled rickshaw, powered sometimes by a bicycle and at others powered by a motorcycle.

The ride from Cusco to Urubamba, including photo ops, has taken well under two hours, and from there it’s a short and scenic drive along the river to Pisac’s artisan market and Inca ruins.